How to use the ALI Data Portal: Part 2 Index Breakdown Page

How-to-Use-the-ALI-Data-Portal-Part-2-Index-Breakdown-Page

Leadership data, at your fingertips

The Australian Leadership Index (ALI) offers the general public, as well as specialist audiences, such as journalists, a means to learn what the Australian community thinks about leadership, accountability, transparency, ethics, and much else besides, in the public, private and plural sectors.

The key to this is ALI’s unique open access data portal, which allows users to glean powerful insights into the community perceptions of leadership for the greater good in Australia, as well as insights into public perceptions and expectations of the key drivers of leadership for the greater good in the institutions of the government, public, private and not-for-profit sectors. This information not only provides in-depth results about the community beliefs about the state of leadership in Australia but, importantly, clear, actionable insights into what can be done to improve the practice of leadership for the greater good. With data available since September 2018, the Australian Leadership Index is a veritable treasure trove for journalists, organisational leaders, board members and the general public.

Overview of the ALI data portal

The ALI data portal comprises five tools that provide increasingly granular insights into the perceived state of leadership for the greater good in Australian organisations and institutions. The first of these is the executive summary, which present high level data analysis of the state of leadership for the greater good in the government, public, private and not-for-profit sectors The second is the index breakdown, which shows how the four sectors are performing on the specific components that underpin their ALI score. The third is the sector comparison, which enables comparison between different institutions on specific components of leadership for the greater good. The fourth is the institution breakdown, which presents detailed analyses for specific institutions in terms of their ALI score, the specific components that underpin their ALI score, and how these scores vary as a function of demographics. The fifth and final tool is the custom chart builder, which allows users of the portal to analyse the data by building their own custom charts using any of the questions and profiling variables from the study.

This note is part two of a five-part series on the ALI data portal. The focus of this note is the Index Breakdown page.

Deep dive into the Index Breakdown

The Index Breakdown comprises six sections. The first section, presented in figure 1, is the overall index breakdown, which presents a wealth of information about overall perceptions of leadership for the public good, expressed both as an ALI score and a percentage, as well as a series of statistics about public perceptions and expectations of the nine drivers of public perceptions of leadership for the public good.

Figure 1. Overall index breakdown

Figure 1. Overall index breakdown

At the top of the overall index breakdown box are two key high-level metrics. The first of these metrics, highlighted by the green box in figure 2, is the overall ALI score. Each ALI index score is calculated in a similar way to the Net Promoter Score, which is a well-known and easily understood index ranging from -100 to 100. Each score is calculated as the proportion of people who believe that a given institution shows leadership for the greater good to a ‘fairly large’ or ‘extremely large’ extent minus those who believe that the institution shows leadership for the greater good to ‘some extent’ or ‘not at all’. More information about the calculation of ALI scores is presented in the first note in this ‘how to’ series.

The second metric, highlighted by the orange box in figure 2, reports the proportion of respondents who think Australian institutions, in general, show leadership for the public good. Specifically, it is the percentage of respondents who think that Australian institutions, in general, show leadership for the public good to a ‘fairly large’ or ‘extremely large’ extent.

Figure 2. Overall ALI score and perceptions of leadership for the public good

Figure 2. Overall ALI score and perceptions of leadership for the public good

At the bottom of the overall index breakdown box, highlighted by the blue box in figure 3, are public perceptions and expectations of the nine drivers of public perceptions of leadership for the greater good. These metrics principally illustrate the large discrepancies between the perceived performance of Australian institutions and community expectations of how these institutions ought to behave.

The size of these discrepancies is presented in the column called ‘gap’, which reports the percentage point difference between public perceptions and expectations. For example, 63% of respondent expect Australian institutions to focus on the creation of social value to a ‘fairly large’ or ‘extremely large’ extent. However, only 31% of respondent think Australian institutions to focus on the creation of social value to a ‘fairly large’ or ‘extremely large’ extent. The discrepancy or gap between perceptions and expectations on this metric is -32% percentage points, which indicates that perceived performance falls short of expectations.

This analysis is performed for all nine drivers of public perceptions of leadership for the greater good. Three of these drivers pertain to the type of value that leaders focus on creating (i.e., social value, environmental value, economic value). Yet another three pertain to how leaders create value (i.e., accountability, transparency, ethicality). Finally, three drivers pertain to the people for whom leaders create value and their responsiveness to the needs and interests of these stakeholders (i.e., the people leaders and their institutions serve, society-at-large), as well as the extent to which leaders balance the interests of different groups of stakeholders. More information about these drivers and their relationship to leadership for the greater good can be found in the ALI 2019 annual report, as well as our series of explainer articles, which are available via the ALI articles page.

Figure 3. Public perceptions and expectations of the nine drivers of leadership for the greater good

Figure 3. Public perceptions and expectations of the nine drivers of leadership for the greater good

The final part of the overall index breakdown box are the ‘impact’ metrics, which are highlighted in the yellow box in figure 4. ‘Impact’ is an intuitive way of describing the drivers of public perceptions of leadership for the public good. These percentages are derived from multiple regression analyses of the extent to which the nine drivers predict public perceptions of leadership for the public good in Australian institutions. However, given that interpretation of regression coefficients requires some expertise in statistics, these coefficients are expressed as percentages to indicate their relative impact on perceptions of leadership for the greater good.

Interpretation of impact scores is straightforward: the higher the percentage, the more important the driver is as a driver of public perceptions of leadership for the greater good. A score of zero for a given driver means that the driver does not predict perceptions of leadership for the greater good. To illustrate, in this example, leaders’ focus on creating social value predicts leadership for the greater good (illustrated by an impact score of 13%), such that the more leaders are perceived to focus on creating social value, the more they are perceived as showing leadership for the greater good. By contrast, leaders’ focus on creating economic value does not predict leadership for the greater good (illustrated by an impact score of 0%). The strongest overall driver of leadership for the greater good among Australian institutions in general is ethicality (19%), defined as the extent to which leaders behave in accord with relevant moral and ethical standards of professional conduct.

Figure 4. Impact of drivers on public perceptions of leadership for the greater good

Figure 4. Impact of drivers on public perceptions of leadership for the greater good

In addition to the overall index breakdown, the aforementioned metrics can be generated for specific sectors (i.e., the government, public, private and not-for-profit sectors). Specific sectors are selected via the menu on the left-hand side of the screen, which is highlighted in the yellow box in figure 5. This menu can also be used to change whether quarterly or annual results are presented, as well as the specific period of data. By altering these settings, users can present all results since data collection started (September 2018) or specific quarters.

Figure 5. Sector breakdown

Figure 5. Sector breakdown

Notably, it is also possible to filter within these results to investigate how demographic factors affect public perceptions. Imagine, for example, that you want to know how age affects perceptions of government leadership for the greater good and public perceptions and expectations of the drivers of these perceptions. Specifically, imagine that you want to know how people who are between 18 and 34 years of age view government leadership. A simple three-step process is all that is required obtain these results (see figure 6). First, click the ‘filter’ icon, which is encircled in red. Second, select ’18-24’ and ’25-34’ under ‘age group’. Third, click the tick icon at the bottom right-hand-side of the screen.

Figure 6. Filtering results using the filter function of the ALI data portal

Figure 6. Filtering results using the filter function of the ALI data portal

Conclusion

As demonstrated in this note, the Index Breakdown section of the data portal yields a wealth of information about public perceptions and expectations of the nine key drivers of public perceptions of leadership for the greater good, discrepancies between these perceptions and expectations, and the contribution of each driver to public perceptions of each driver to public perceptions of leadership for the greater good.

In the next note in this series, attention turns to the Sector Breakdown section, which enables comparisons to be made across different sectors and institutions for specific components. This section is indispensable to those who want to learn about how different institutions within specific sectors compare in terms of leadership for the public good and the nine drivers of public perceptions of leadership for the greater good.

About the Australian Leadership Index

The Australian Leadership Index is a national leadership survey that provides a comprehensive picture of leadership for the greater good in Australia. Made possible by the generous support of the Graham Foundation, the Australian Leadership Index is nationally significant for a number of reasons.

It is the largest ever study of leadership for the greater good. Each quarter, the ALI surveys 1,000 people across Australia about their beliefs about leadership for the greater good by Australian organisations and institutions. The ALI also reveals how institutions in different sectors vary in terms of leadership for the greater good, as well as the drivers of these perceptions, revealing new insights into what institutional leaders can do to show leadership for the greater good. Finally, by making all ALI data freely available via the ALI data portal, the Australian Leadership Index provides the public, journalists and leaders with a powerful new tool to help bring forth the leadership Australia needs for the future Australians want.

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For enquires or media requests, please get in touch with Dr Sam Wilson on sgwilson@swin.edu.au or fill out the contact form with your details and we will get back to you as soon as possible.

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